The Great Blue Heron is the largest and most widespread heron in North America. These birds can be found along the ocean shore or at the edges of small inland ponds; they live in San Diego year-round. Although their plumage is more gray than blue, they lay pale blue eggs, which may be part of the reason for their name.

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Project Wildlife's Animal Ambassadors
Bobber

Bobber

Bobber came to Project Wildlife in the summer of 2011 as a young fledgling with a head injury and was named for the way he bobs his head up and down. He couldn’t be released due to neurological damage which made him unable to reach full flight. His injuries also made him very docile and therefore a great Animal Ambassador. In addition to being a Project Wildlife Animal Ambassador, his tolerant nature makes him a perfect surrogate “parent” for young wild American Kestrels.

Boo

Boo

Boo came to Project Wildlife as a young owl who had been raised by the public. Due to being hand-raised, Boo is not afraid of people and as a result cannot survive in the wild. Boo lives in Ramona with his caregiver with whom he has formed a special bond. In addition to flying right to his caregiver’s wrist for training sessions and outings, during breeding season Boo makes mating calls to his caregiver to let him know that he’s his chosen mate!

Druk

Druk

Druk is a female Rosy Boa who came to Project Wildlife in early 2011. She was captive bred for the pet trade, but due to a spinal column deformity she was considered non-sellable and so she came to Project Wildlife instead. Druk’s deformity may hinder her ability to unhinge her jaw like a normal snake (she’s currently too young to eat on her own and is force-fed by her caregiver). Druk is being carefully monitored by a veterinarian to assess any health issues that may arise as a result. The Rosy Boa is native to Southern California and is very easy to spot in the wild due to its bright coloration. While most Rosy Boas are “rosy-colored,” Druk has a more rare grey and black striped coloration.

Guinevere

Guinevere

Guinevere, the Merlin Falcon, joined us in 2005 as an adult with a wing injury that removed her ability to fly properly. After kestrels, Merlins are the smallest of the falcons in North America and are known for their speed and agility in flight. Merlins were also the species of falcon used by the ladies of the court in medival Europe. They are rare to see in a captive education program in Southern California because they are not present here year-round, but only migrate through the area as adult birds. Guinevere is a talkative bird who will often announce herself on programs with a Merlin’s typical territorial calls.

KwaPai

KwaPai

KwaPai is a Red-shouldered Hawk who came to Project Wildlife as a hatchling in 2004. He was found on the ground underneath a nest, and it was soon discovered that he was blind in his right eye. With poor depth perception and the inability to see danger from one side, KwaPai was unable to be released into the wild. KwaPai’s vocalizations and regal bearing inspired his name, which means “chief” in a dialect of the Kumeyaay people. He actually has a very calm personality and loves the showers he gets in his enclosure on hot days, holding out his wings to get soaking wet underneath.

Luna

Luna

As a very young adolescent, this female Western Screech Owl was transferred to Project Wildlife by a veterinary hospital in July 2011 with severe head injuries. After Luna was examined by our staff veterinarian and a veterinary eye specialist, it was determined she had loss of vision in her left eye, damage to her right eye and loss of hearing in her left ear. Without at least one healthy eye and both functioning ears, she would be unable to survive in the wild. She has since adapted well to life in captivity, and can now be found doing educational programs throughout San Diego County.

Moki

Moki

Moki (Hawaiian for “Rascal”) is a Common Raven brought to Project Wildlife in 2000 as a hatchling with a broken wing. His injury did not heal completely enough for him to be able to survive on his own in the wild. As a result, we brought him into our Education program and habituated him to humans and human behavior. Like all ravens, Moki is excellent at imitating sounds that he hears regularly, including the voice of his regular caregiver.

Margarita

Margarita

Margarita, an American Crow, came to Project Wildlife in 2002 after spending two years at the Chula Vista Nature Center where she came in as a healthy, orphaned nestling. Unfortunately she had imprinted on her rehabilitator and therefore wasn’t able to be released. She now enjoys bathing in hot weather and then drying off in front of her fan. Curious and intelligent, Margarita also loves to complete bird puzzles in order to get her favorite treats, pistachios and meal worms. Margarita is fully flighted and enjoys chasing away ‘intruder’ crows from her enclosure by ringing a cowbell.

Pepper

Pepper

Pepper, an Acorn Woodpecker arrived as a young bird to the Project Wildlife Triage Center in 2008. Due to her poor health and an unfortunate series of events, she lost the upper part of her beak, breaking it off so close to her face that it will not re-grow. Pepper needs to be on a modified diet and cannot be released into the wild. Despite having half a beak, she still happily pecks at wood and forages in her enclosure for her favorite acorns, cleverly hidden by her caregiver to keep her active and challenged.

Soyala

Soyala

Soyala, the Great-horned Owl, was brought into the Triage Center as a hatchling in March 2009. She was found on the ground beneath a nest with an obvious wing injury. It was soon discovered the wing injury would cause permanent flight restrictions for Soyala, making her non-releasable. Soyala is a Hopi word that refers to the time of the winter solstice; she was named by Ruth Hayward who won the opportunity to name her in our We Like it Wild! Auction.

Ugs

Ugs

Ugs (Uguku – Cherokee for “Story Teller”) is a Barn Owl who was found on the ground as a hatchling in May 2004. His left wing was broken in three places, and he also had left leg and foot damage. These injuries may have been caused by a traumatic fall or could be the result of a type of brittle bone disease. Regardless, though he survived his injuries, his condition will not allow him to survive effectively in the wild. At present Ugs is currently only available for smaller, indoor programs.

Care Center

Wildlife Care Center
Custer Street
San Diego, CA 92110
Directions & Map
Open 7 days a week
(except Thanksgiving, Christmas, & New Year's Day)
Staff/Volunteer hours: 8:30a.m. - 5:00p.m.
Drop-off area is open 24/7.

Outside of San Diego County?
If you are outside of our geographical area, please visit the emergency page of Wildlife International or contact your local Department of Animal Control or state Fish and Game office.

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Resources for the media to learn more about the good work Project Wildlife provides San Diego County.

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Wish List

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